makeyoufold:

moriar-t-e-a:

rachaelsrambles:

Guys, hey, guys. Do you remember that time that Coulson called Natasha and she ended up forming the Avengers?  Remember how she did that by digging up Bruce Banner and introducing Steve to him then was the voice of reason when Tony and Steve were bickering and then how she brought Clint back from being mind controlled so that they can be a team? Remember that? Remember how the Black Widow out smarted a god? Remember that time she kept her shit together when the Hulk attacked her, even though she was really scared? Remember when she knocked an alien off his flying scooter and figured out how to drive it despite it being extrateresstrial tech, then got her ass up to the top of Stark Tower, found Loki’s staff and saved the world from being invaded by turning off the machine?

Remember how she was the central character of the whole freaking movie?

Anyone else remember that? I sure do. 

#and remember how they didn’t sexualize her #remember how she was independent and didn’t need a male crutch #remember how when loki implied that she needed a man she completely tore him down #remember how natasha romanov doesn’t take shit from nobody #especially not a man

and yet all they asked scarlet was how difficult was it to get in her suit. 

(via spiralstreesandcupsoftea)

The monetization of fandom: How media franchises pay to have a fan following built from scratch.

Online fandoms are now the popular media equivalent of the tech world’s early adopters. If you can get people to start blogging and tweeting about your TV show or movie, half the work is already done.

The good news is, your social media campaign doesn’t even need to be all that subtle. If you say that you’ll release the new Divergent trailer after a thousand retweets, a thousand fans will retweet you, cheerfully aware that they’re own Twitter feeds are being used for advertising purposes. Even fast food joints are trying to build their own fandoms, with Denny’s currently in the lead thanks to their inexplicably cool Tumblr presence.

Inevitably, there’s now a lucrative market for social media consultants who can engineer online fandoms from scratch, with the fans as willing participants in the deal. It’s an “if you build it, they will come,” kind of situation. Fans want to show support for their favorite TV show or movie, even if they’re completely aware that it’s a cynical marketing ploy. In the era of Facebook communication, you are what you Like.

In a recent episode of PBS documentary series Frontline, Douglas Rushkoff took a look at various social media fandoms from the ground up. With YouTube star Tyler Oakley at the most organic end of the popularity scale and the Hunger Games movies as the most professionally cultivated example, all of those fandoms had one thing in common: a desire to feel closer to your idols, even if the most tangible sign of that relationship is a retweet.

[READ MORE]

theramblingfangirl:

Yesterday I posted a photo of my start to the new year: Seven years bad luck? I purchased another mirror for my door and my dad suggested I glue (with some hardcore adhesive) it on the wood, rather than mount it (stop giggling). In order to do that, we had to take off my closet doors.
It was a little jarring, at first, not to have them there, but now I’m thinking that I wouldn’t mind keeping them off permanently. But then I wouldn’t have a mirror or a place to put my dry-erase calendar, which holds the secrets to my life. 
ETA: Isn’t the color on my wall fabulous? I’m still in love with my DIY room renovation from last year. Also, check out my lady love being all gorgeous and stuff. Art makes me happy.
(2/366)

Reblogging because my bedroom is my safe haven. The only downside to getting married will be having to give this up. High-res

theramblingfangirl:

Yesterday I posted a photo of my start to the new year: Seven years bad luck? I purchased another mirror for my door and my dad suggested I glue (with some hardcore adhesive) it on the wood, rather than mount it (stop giggling). In order to do that, we had to take off my closet doors.

It was a little jarring, at first, not to have them there, but now I’m thinking that I wouldn’t mind keeping them off permanently. But then I wouldn’t have a mirror or a place to put my dry-erase calendar, which holds the secrets to my life.

ETA: Isn’t the color on my wall fabulous? I’m still in love with my DIY room renovation from last year. Also, check out my lady love being all gorgeous and stuff. Art makes me happy.

(2/366)

Reblogging because my bedroom is my safe haven. The only downside to getting married will be having to give this up.